The Importance of Sleep with Sleep Meditation Music

We spend about a quarter to a third of our lives asleep, but just because we are not awake doesn’t mean that time is unproductive. The physiological changes that occur when we are asleep determine how well we feel and perform when we are awake. It’s often said that diet, exercise, and sleep are the three foundational pillars to good health and well-being. While many of us understand the importance of eating a healthy, balanced diet and of keeping fit, we are perhaps less familiar with how important sleep is. We’ve all experienced the effects of too little sleep: what it means for our mood, focus, and concentration, and also how it affects us physically—we have less energy, and feel tired and groggy. However, the importance of sleep and the consequences of being sleep-deprived go beyond this. Sleep influences all the major systems in our body, and those systems in turn influence our sleep. Insufficient sleep can disrupt bodily functions that affect how we think and behave, and how we think and behave can disrupt our sleep. Therefore, problems with sleeping can quickly become a vicious cycle. Deep sleep meditation music is an effective but simple therapeutic treatment to make you fall fast asleep and to stay asleep the whole night, this has been recommended by medical and health professionals for more than 30 years, more about how to use and download free music online mp3 down below.

At its simplest, sleep plays an important role in: Creating a healthy immune system, repairing muscle, consolidating learning and memory, regulating growth and appetite through the release of certain hormones and regulating mood and emotion. Sufficient sleep is essential to our well-being, both physically and emotionally, so it is not surprising that when we are deprived of it we feel the impact in all areas of our life. There is plenty of evidence that poor-quality or too little sleep can have serious consequences for our physical and mental health. Research on sleep usually measures objective and/or subjective sleep quality, and there is an important distinction between the two: Objective sleep quality is assessed in laboratory conditions to determine the duration, efficiency, minimal broken sleep, and proper cycling through the different stages of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Subjective sleep quality is our perception of how easily we fall asleep and whether it feels as if we had enough to feel rested throughout the day. Problems with either can be debilitating, but the difference is significant in that, while it may be difficult to significantly improve sleep objectively for physiological reasons, we can change our perception of our sleep and its quality, and thereby our relationship with it. If we don’t feel depleted by our experience, we are much more likely to view it neutrally or even favorably. This is where practicing sleep meditation may be particularly helpful, since with meditation we never “tackle” a problem in order to fix it. Instead, as we learn to accept it, our perception of the difficulty changes and it becomes less of a problem for us. However, we must practice sleep meditation to allow this to happen—we can’t just tell ourselves to accept something. Acceptance arises from a raft of things coming together.

Sleep meditation music is a simple yet effective way to help you fall asleep and sink into a deep sleep with the help of soothing delta brain waves. Powerful delta waves help to quiet an overactive mind. Sounds to help you rest during the daytime and unwind during the night. Good music for sleeping consists of soothing sound waves over a wide frequency range, that is often mixed with soft instrumental music or atmospheric ambient music to encourage deep sleep. The most common thing that interfere with a good night’s sleep is anxiety, the right type of music or sound can change this and improve the overall sleep quality.  People with complete sleep deprivation like those who suffer from insomnia might be helped by the right type of music for sleeping. Some prefer soft music for relaxation or meditation to treat anxiety or relieve depression when one is feeling down and hopeless. Others prefer sleep meditation music to stimulate lucid dreaming, some with insomnia play relaxing background music during bedtime to help them relax both body and mind which improves the chance of falling asleep, a safer and cheaper alternative than sleep inducing medication. Improve your sleep quality today download free music online mp3 and sleep through the whole night without any disturbances with our unique sleep meditation music with delta waves. Music specially made for deep relaxation and an uninterrupted sleep cycle.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN WE SLEEP?

Until the early 20th century, when we became able to measure brain activity with electroencephalogram (EEG) rays, it was believed that during sleep the brain shut down and rested from the activity of the day. However, the reality is very different, and in fact the brain can be more active when we are asleep than when we are awake. Whether we are awake or asleep depends on activity in specific areas of the brain. The part of the brain that promotes wakefulness also inhibits the part that promotes sleep activity, and vice versa. The shift between the different areas is caused by internal factors such as the circadian rhythm and the release of hormones, and is usually self-regulating. The drive to sleep increases the longer we are awake, and as we sleep it abates so that it is near zero when we wake. Sleep, or more officially the sleep cycle, is made up of different stages of REM and n-REM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep. Each cycle lasts about 90 minutes and is repeated three to six times each night. However, this cycle may be disrupted by stimulants such as coffee, nicotine, and alcohol, as well as by medical conditions and sleep deprivation. We usually spend about 75 percent of the night in n-REM and 25 percent in REM sleep. Each of the different stages is as important as the others, and it is believed that the right balance of all the stages is crucial for restful and restorative sleep, which promotes learning, memory, and growth processes such as cell formation and repair, and regulates mood and the ability to concentrate. The first cycle begins with a period of n-REM.

REM sleep usually occurs about 90 minutes after falling asleep. It recurs every 90 minutes or so, and lasts longer as the night progresses. There is intense brain activity similar to when we are awake. This is when we are most likely to dream. During REM sleep, breathing is faster, shallower, and more irregular. The heart rate and blood pressure increase, and the eyes often dart back and forth, causing the eyelids to flicker. Body temperature drops to its lowest point. Although the brain is awake, the body is paralyzed—a safety measure preventing us from acting out our dreams and perhaps causing injury. It is thought that memories and learning are consolidated during REM sleep, that the body’s brain chemistry is restored to a natural balance, and that mood is regulated.

Hormones play an important role in regulating our sleepiness or wakefulness. During the various stages of sleep, some hormones are secreted and/or released and others are inhibited or reduced. These often determine how the body functions, for example suppressing appetite. When our sleep is disrupted, therefore, the hormones are unable to function as they should, and that can have a negative impact on our health and well-being. For instance, diabetes is caused by the body’s inability to produce insulin, and insufficient sleep increases the risk of diabetes. However, those who sleep longer than 9 hours also seem to be at a greater risk of diabetes, so, where insulin is concerned, it seems to be the right balance of sleep that may be significant.

High levels of stress hormones and anxiety disrupt the sleep of millions of people worldwide. Tossing and turning in bed and over thinking keeps many of us up all night. Listening to deep sleep meditation music at night time will have a great effect on your overall health. As an example, instead of sweating and worrying in bed your attention is no longer on those intrusive thoughts that keep your mind active, but instead calmed by the soothing sound of sleep meditation music. Music for sleeping has the ability to affect you in a number of positive ways, it encourages better sleep patterns for people with sleep problems and it also encourages mind body relaxation. Listening to your favorite tune or relaxing music on a regular basis has shown to reduce unhealthy levels of stress. Patients suffering from insomnia, anxiety and depression had a positive response to the auditory music therapy, it positively altered the patients’ mood and well-being. You can at this site download free music online mp3 for relaxation, meditation and sleep.

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What is Mindfulness Meditation

Mindfulness meditation is intentionally paying attention to your experience as it arises, without judging it. Most of the time what we experience just feels like a big blob. However, when we start paying attention we realize that our experience is multi- layered: It is made up of inner and outer experiences, and strands within them. Our inner experience consists of thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations; our outer experience is made up of the environment, behavior, and actions (our own and those of other people). All these arise individually and simultaneously, and interact with and influence one another. How we pay attention is crucial. We want to notice whatever is arising without judging it, and actively cultivate attitudes of kindness and gentleness to what we notice. When we start practicing mindfulness meditation, the first thing we often notice is how judgmental we are— judging situations, others, and, of course, ourselves. It is easy to fall into the trap of judging ourselves for being so judgmental! However, there is a difference between judging and discerning, and there is nothing wrong with having preferences. We can cultivate the quality of mindfulness meditation through practicing meditation, both formal (a regular practice that might include sitting practice, movement—yoga, walking, tai chi, qiqong—or a body scan) and informal, when we pay attention to what we are doing while we are doing it as we go about our day. Both types of practice are valuable and support each other. More about mindfulness meditation down below.

 

Mindfulness Meditation Music

THE ORIGINS OF MINDFULNESS MEDITATION
The recent popularity of mindfulness meditation may lead you to think that it is something new, but it is quite the opposite. Mindfulness is a quality within us all, but it can be cultivated consciously through meditation, and this has been practiced for thousands of years. The secular form of mindfulness meditation that we discuss here came to the West more than 30 years ago and was developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn and his colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Hospital as a way of helping patients with chronic medical conditions learn to live with them. Since then its use has spread, and adapted mindfulness-based approaches are being used for medical disorders such as depression, anxiety, addiction, cancer, and pain, among many others, as well as in mainstream contexts such as schools, prisons, government, the workplace, and the sports arena. One reason that it has been accepted into such a diverse range of areas is the strong evidence for its efficacy. This is growing all the time, particularly in new areas, and mindfulness and sleep is one of those.

MINDFULNESS MEDITATION PRACTICE
When we practice mindfulness meditation, we are focusing our attention on something in particular (such as the breath, physical sensations, sounds, or thoughts) for a certain amount of time. The regularity of the practice is more important than the duration, so try to do it a few times a week if you can’t do it every day. It is better to sit for a shorter time, perhaps 5 minutes to begin with, and build it up, rather than struggle to sit for 30 minutes and feel that you have failed. When we meditate, our mind will wander sooner rather than later, and at some point we notice that. This is a moment of pure awareness—we are in the present moment and we know that we are thinking. We acknowledge that we are “thinking” and bring our attention back to the focus, whatever that is. If we practice mindfulness meditation regularly, we end up doing this thousands of times. Every time we bring the attention back we are practicing letting go of a distraction, encouraging the unconscious mind to notice mind-wandering (which is why it is important not to beat ourselves up about it), practicing deliberately placing our attention where we want it to be, and cultivating attitudes of kindness, gentleness, curiosity, patience, letting go, acceptance, and non-striving. Therefore every time we exercise this muscle of awareness, we lay down new neural pathways in the brain: We change our brain and the way it works. Much of our day-to-day stress is caused by trying to control our experience, and particularly by things not being as we would like them to be, and the same thing happens at night if we are not sleeping as we think we should. When we practice mindfulness meditation regularly, we notice how our experience is always changing. We become more comfortable with change and realize that we can’t control our experience. When we struggle with not sleeping, we can get into a vicious cycle of trying to control all the elements that may influence sleep; but actually, this undermines it. As we meditate, every state of mind will arise at some point: physical discomfort, boredom, restlessness, irritation, calm, peace, ease … Learning to explore these different states “on the mat” in a safe environment gives us the opportunity to practice being with them. Through noticing how they manifest in the body and how we habitually react to them, and through meeting them, we learn a different way to respond to them. Thus, when the same states of mind arise in everyday life, we are already familiar with them. There is also an important element of showing up to practice. If we establish a regular mindfulness meditation practice (maybe just 10–15 minutes a day), we do it regardless of whether we are in the mood. This is important: It cultivates a willingness to be with whatever shows up, however we are, and it can be helpful when we experience a bout of insomnia or face unexpected events. We often find it easier to pay attention to our experience if we make a specific time to do so, without any distractions, and setting aside a time to meditate allows this.

HOW DOES MINDFULNESS HELP?
According to Mindful Nation UK, mindfulness meditation training teaches people to become more aware of their thoughts, emotions, and body sensations, as well as being less reactive and judgmental toward them. They start recognizing thoughts as mental events rather than facts, and discover ways of dealing with automatic reactions to stress. They also become able to notice pleasant events and enjoy them, and develop a greater overall attitude of unconditional kindness, both toward themselves and others. The result of this is that they respond to their own experience, and to events in their lives and the people around them, in a healthier and more compassionate way. Whatever brings us to mindfulness meditation—anxiety, pain, sleeplessness, or something else—we never actually try to “fix” that particular problem. Instead, we learn to relate to our “suffering”—whether physical or psychological—in a different way. Forcing ourselves to fall asleep (or resisting being awake) is a non-starter. Learning how to move from a place of resisting or not wanting our experience to one of allowing it to be (since it’s already here) is at the heart of mindfulness meditation practice. Paradoxically, by letting go of the need to fall asleep you may find that your sleep improves. Regardless of this, however, acceptance involves letting go of the mental struggle that can be so exhausting, and therefore you may feel less tired even if you are not actually sleeping more.

Guided Mindfulness Meditations

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Zen Guided Meditation

Free Guided Meditation for Mind Body and Spirit

Zen Guided Sleep Meditation for Deep Relaxation & Inner Peace

Lay down comfortably and listen to our unique free guided meditation that will walks you through a meditation to help you attain a relaxed body and a peaceful mind, guided by a soothing voice. Our complex brain does not make a difference between real or imagined events so what you are experiencing lying on your back is to your brain like having a real-life experience. Read More

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Free Zen Music

Free Zen Music for Mind Body and Spirit

Download Free Music Online Mp3 of Zen Meditation Music

Free Sleep Music for Deep Sleep

At this unique Zen music website with peaceful music for mind body and spirit, you can download free Zen music for meditation and sleep. We offer you the best and most healing Zen meditation music and calming Zen sleep music available online. Let the subtle relaxing sounds with binaural beats, that is theta waves for meditation and delta waves for deep sleep take you to a higher state of consciousness and relaxation. Read More

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Benefits of Zen Meditation

“The practice of Zen is forgetting the self in the act of uniting with something.”
Koun Yamada

Many meditators have over the years benefited both mentally and physically a great deal by practicing Meditation regularly, transforming themselves by reaching different realms and having profound insights. Other incredible benefits of Zen meditation are that it helps to reduce high levels of stress and anxiety, it also brings down the frequency of panic attacks. Meditation improves the production of serotonin a vital hormone for happiness, otherwise low serotonin levels can cause depression, insomnia and obesity. Sleep much deeper and longer thanks to Zen meditation practice, a peaceful night of sleep is essential for the body, it is during sleep when the body heal itself. Strengthen your immune system with the help of meditation, studies conducted in this field have shown that meditation helps to greatly improve the immune system. And a better immune system means that you will fall sick less often due to minor infections and ailments like common cold, flu etcetera. Regular Zen practice can also help to reduce the sensation of pain and the sensitivity to it, because during Zen practice the meditator learns how to cope with pain and other sensations.

 

Benefits of Zen MeditationThere are even more amazing health benefits of Zen practice. Zen meditation improves your posture, as the practice helps you strengthen your back muscles. Many of us today suffers from a bad back, probably because of long hours spent in front of computers and driving cars. Meditation will make the body stronger and more flexible by aligning the muscles of the spine. It also helps to strengthen the muscles of the abdomen. A strong body core protects the back from both pain and strain and an improved posture improves the overall strength of the body, making the meditator appear taller. The way you think changes for the better thanks to Zen practice, this can help you to get rid of any addiction you might have. Addiction is a form of attachment to something, like the attachment to fear, or loss, or longing, and with Meditation you can overcome these attachments and fears and concentrate on your purpose in life. Practicing Zen meditation daily improves the vascular system as well, it helps to lower the heart rate and improve your blood circulation, both of which also contributes to a healthier body making you look younger and feel better. Just imagen all those old Buddhist monks with their loving smiles and how youthful they all look, thanks to the incredible benefits of Zen Meditation.

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